Friday, 28 September 2018

Learn - Research - Literature Review

Seddon, M. (2017). Strategies for integrating literacy into a science classroom. Graduate Research
Papers, 115.


Simply assigning reading (even if it’s from a variety of sources) in a science course is not adequate
for students to become effective readers that can utilize the text to delve deeper into the science
content. In order to be effective in the use of the strategies listed below, teachers must understand
the strategy’s purpose and how to instruct and model the use of the strategy to students.


Content literacy strategies:

  • Annotation
  • Anticipation reading guides
  • Reflections
  • Graphic organizers
  • Summarization and synthesis


I’m going to break down these strategies into different blog posts so it’s not an overload for my
readers!


Annotation
Have students make markings in the text in places where they make connections or have questions.
Markings could include symbols, phrases, and reflections written in the margins or within the text.


This strategy provides students with a visible record of their thoughts that they can use to respond,
summarise and reflect upon their learning later. It slows the reading down and allows students to
discover or uncover ideas that would not emerge otherwise (O’Donnell, 2004). Students should
begin to see their reading as an active process of comprehension or a way of learning.


Students tend to categorize their annotations into making predictions, asking questions, making
connections, defining vocabulary, analyzing or evaluating the author’s craft, stating opinions, and
spotting patterns or trends. To ensure students take ownership in their learning from annotation,
students should be required to use their annotations again upon completion of the reading by
reflecting on them or through written or oral discussion.


To incorporate annotation in your classes, start with a short story or article that can be read in less
than a class period, e.g. from Biologynews.net, Science Daily, New York Times Science, or IFLScience.
However, annotation will become a more powerful tool when it is incorporated in a full unit where
students utilize their annotations before, during and at the conclusion of a unit to demonstrate their
learning and understanding.

I’m going to cover the other strategies in later blog posts :)

No comments:

Post a comment